Stone picking farmer inadvertently moves border

Stone picking farmer inadvertently moves border

Grains
BIG MOVE: A farmer innocently moving a stone in the quiet European landscape was actually shifting a border markr than had marked the boundary of France and Belgium for 200 years.

BIG MOVE: A farmer innocently moving a stone in the quiet European landscape was actually shifting a border markr than had marked the boundary of France and Belgium for 200 years.

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A Belgian farmer just thought moving an old stone market would make cropping easier, instead it caused a minor international incident.

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A pesky stone interrupting cropping rows is moved safely to one side of the paddock.

It's a scene that is played out across the world, from subsidence farmers using a horse and cart to those in the most up-to-date gear and raises barely a ripple of interest.

Except, that is, if you're farming on the French-Belgian border and the rock messing up your GPS A-B lines is a historic marker that has denoted the boundary between the two countries for over 200 years.

In that case, moving the boulder is going to cause a low-key international incident.

That was the case last week near the Belgian hamlet of Erquelinnes, where a local walker and historian noticed the marked stone had been moved approximately 2.3 metres, altering the boundaries set up under the Treaty of Kortrijk way back in 1820, albeit on a minute scale.

However, there are no signs of the move sparking a border skirmish.

The two nations, linked closely through their joint membership of the European Union, have instead simply asked the farmer to put the marker back where it was, a brief pause of the GPS and a swerve around the stone a small price to pay for smooth international relations.

The story Stone picking farmer inadvertently moves border first appeared on Farm Online.

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