Powranna Herefords rise to the occasion

Powranna Herefords rise to the occasion

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Hereford weaners from prominent Tasmanian breeders filled the feature front-lane pens of the Elders Powranna Livestock Complex last Thursday.

Hereford weaners from prominent Tasmanian breeders filled the feature front-lane pens of the Elders Powranna Livestock Complex last Thursday.

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Tasmanian weaners firm with no difference in price between the competing colours.

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The Hereford breed stood proud and strong in the second of Elders' autumn weaner calf sales at Powranna, Tasmania, last Thursday.

Being conducted as the fourth in the Tasmanian series of sales for 2019, the quality of the white-faced line up was said to be very good as most came forward from the Derwent Valley and the mountain districts of the lower Midlands regions.

John Denholm, Elders, said it was an impressive yarding of cattle.

"It was a wonderful display from a very proud and prominent set of breeders," Mr Denholm said.

A Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA) report of the market said competition was strong although there was some variance throughout the sale with the best of the breed bringing a premium.

MLA said the heaviest steers made $1050-$1350 a head, averaging 320-330 cents a kilogram, medium weights made $780-$1180 or 325-335c/kg, while light weights were sold from $600-$920 or 325c/kg.

A very small selection of young late-drop steers made $570-$650.

The heaviest heifers made $950-$1160 or 275c/kg, medium weights sold from $700-$950 or 270-280c/kg and light weights sold from $510-$830, or 255c/kg.

Greg Harris, Elders, said prices were "a tad" firmer overall.

"The whole box and dice averaged 300c/kg, with the heavier steers pulling rates of 360-370c/kg and the middle runs, 320-330c/kg," Mr Harris said.

A good number of Angus cattle were also featured in the 2100-head penning.

Mr Harris said there was no difference in price between the competing colours, although any small sale lots were discounted as buyers displayed a preference for the larger breeder lines.

However, he said, there was a shift in buying demand.

"Some buyers who would normally operate on the lead of drafts hooked into the lighter cattle in the belief they would not have adequate numbers of longer-term cattle to sell in the spring," he said.

"This definitely helped underpin prices for the smaller cattle, and there was also several buying Hereford heifers to grow out as future breeders."

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