Wiltshire Horn meat success

Dandenong Ranges stud pays top price for Wiltshire Horn ram and ewe


Sheep
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This year's annual Wiltshire Horn show judge has praised breeders for the direction they are taking.

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*5 of 6 rams sold to $700, av $600

SUCCESSFUL SALE: This Laradell ram was awarded third place in the show and was bought by Phil Wischer from Tarwin Lower. It was one of nearly 70 animals, exhibited at the show, which preceded the sale.

SUCCESSFUL SALE: This Laradell ram was awarded third place in the show and was bought by Phil Wischer from Tarwin Lower. It was one of nearly 70 animals, exhibited at the show, which preceded the sale.

*11 of 11 ewes, ewes and lambs sold to $500, av $318

Show results:

  • Ram Over 1.5yrs: 1st Laradell, Seymour, 2nd Highshire, Coomoora
  • Ram Under 1.5yrs: 1st, 2nd, 3rd and Champion Ram, O’Loghlin, Deniliquin, NSW
  • Ram Lamb: 1st, 2nd and Reserve Champion Ram, O’Loghlin. 
  • Ewe Over 1.5yrs: O’Loghlin, 2nd Highshire, 3rd Laradell
  • Ewe Under 1.5yrs: 1st and Champion Ewe, Muskdale, Axedale, 2nd and Reserve Champion, Highshire
  • Ewe Lamb: 1st, 2nd O’Loghlin 
  • Breeders Group of Three: 1st O’Loghlin, 2nd Laradell, 3rd Fischer’s Run, Kinglake

A Dandenong Ranges Wiltshire Horn stud has bought the top priced ram and ewe at this year’s Wiltshire Horn sale held as part of the annual Bendigo Show.

Australian Wiltshire Horn Sheepbreeders Association secretary Jason O’Loghlin said Marty Koolstra, Kallista, bought both animals. The ram was from Mr O’Loghlin’s Deniliquin, NSW, stud, while John Pederson, Whiteway, Somers, sold the top priced ewe.

Mr Koolstra, a stud breeder, said he was looking to improve his sheep’s genetics.

“The two ewes I bought from Whiteway stud had a very good length of body and were structurally very sound, which is what I was looking for,” Mr Koolstra said. He said Mr O’Loghlin was breeding “the best rams out there.

“I bought that ram specifically because it scanned up to have the highest muscle content,” Mr Koolstra said.

“They are a meat sheep, and if we are breeding these animals to get more bang for your buck, you need the muscle.”

Mr O’Loghlin said sheep from five studs were sold at Bendigo.

“There was interest from all over Victoria, we had a buyer from Tasmania, and there were a couple of people from NSW as well,” Mr O’Loghlin said.

The top priced ram, O’Loghlin Globetrotter, White 20, had Stockscan figures of a 44 millimetre muscle depth and 90mm width, with an eye muscle area of 30.49 square centimetres. 

The July 2017-drop ram had seven mm of fat. 

“They are one of those breeds that are incredibly tough,” Mr O’Loghlin said.

“They do well in the dry; they do well in the wet – it’s amazing how adaptable they are. 

“But I know the two ewes that are going to Tasmania are going to get a shock when they go from dry feed to green feed.”

A good spread of ribbons at this years Wiltshire Horn show indicated the breed was in good hands, Mr O’Loghlin said.

He said he felt the show had been “incredibly successful.

“It was a great show, we had 67 head of sheep exhibited on the weekend and there were more studs,” Mr O’Loghlin said.

Judge Geoff Davey, Kerang, said the best sheep in the show were easy to find.

“They stood out pretty well, the breed has improved a heck of a lot in the last five years, with a lot more muscle on the frame,” Mr Davey said.

“The champions were well muscled and correct. They held their heads up and paraded really well.

“The studs have made a big difference – they are doing the right thing, by the breed.

“They are are very easy care sheep,” Mr Davey said.

The Wiltshire Horn was popular among smallholders, as they did not need shearing and were easy lambers.

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