Stud Park South’s increased offering snapped up

Stud Park South’s increased offering snapped up


Sales
Andrew Howells, Elders, Rob Lawrance, ‘Banool’, Cavendish, and Stud Park South stud principal Pat Millear, Willaura, with the top-priced ram of the sale.

Andrew Howells, Elders, Rob Lawrance, ‘Banool’, Cavendish, and Stud Park South stud principal Pat Millear, Willaura, with the top-priced ram of the sale.

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A booming sheep and wool market supported the sale of 98 rams at Stud Park South’s recent ram sale.

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*85 of 98 rams sold to $7000, av $2841

A booming sheep and wool market supported the sale of 98 rams at Stud Park South’s recent ram sale, where a record average was received.

Only 13 rams in the catalogue were passed in, selling to a top of $7000, and an average price of $2841.

Not only was the average up by almost $300 on last year, and the highest ever for the Willaura stud, but it was on an increased offering of rams.

Stud principal Pat Millear said the additional 20 rams fit into the lineup nicely, and contributed to what was one of the most even groups that he had ever offered.

“With the sheep and wool market at record highs, it proves that Merinos are a viable commodity, so people appear to be happy to invest in quality rams,” Mr Millear said.

He said the top-priced ram, Lot 62, was his pick of the bunch.

“He’s got nice, white, nourished wool, and he just ticks all the boxes,” he said.

The ram was purchased by return clients of about five years, Rob and Georgie Lawrance, ‘Banool’, Cavendish.

Mr Lawrance said he also thought the ram was the best in the catalogue.

“He’s true to the type we’re breeding for,” he said.

The 14 month-old ram recorded fleece measurements of 17.8 micron, 3.4 standard deviation, 19.1 co-efficient of variation, and 99.8 per cent comfort factor.

It was one of nine lots purchased by the Lawrance family on the day, to an average of $3781.

Mr Lawrance said their philosophy was that an average price of ram purchases should match the average price they were selling wool bales for at the time.

“And our wool bales have averaged $3600,” he said.

“We think the market is a good reflection of what you should be paying to buy rams.”

Their flock is entirely polled, and the polled genetics coming out of Stud Park South have suited their operation.

They have been in polls for the last eight years, and believe they offer better genetic traits.

“Fat and fertility are directly related to polls, and they’re two of our biggest profit drivers,” he said.

Elders auctioneer Ross Milne said he was not surprised the quality lineup was eagerly snapped up by the large buying gallery.

Mr Milne said the sale result matched the current Merino selling season.

“It’s clear people are re-investing in Merins, most sales this year have had solid averages and clearances,” he said.

“The future’s looking very bright.”

The sale was conducted by Elders.

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