Where's Wally program for wildlife helps farmers and native animals

WildTracker project is calling farmers and landowners in the Northern Midlands

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TECHNOLOGY: One of the cameras used by the WildTracker project to track native wildlife on rural properties. The cameras are used to track populations of bandicoots and other wildlife. Pictures: supplied

TECHNOLOGY: One of the cameras used by the WildTracker project to track native wildlife on rural properties. The cameras are used to track populations of bandicoots and other wildlife. Pictures: supplied

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The project is run by NRM North and the Tasmanian Land Conservancy.

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Farmers and landowners are giving a helping hand to the Eastern-barred bandicoot with technology's help.

NRM North and the Tasmanian Land Conservancy are delivering a five-year project aimed at supporting the population of Eastern-barred bandicoots in Tasmania.

The project is targeting the Northern Midlands area as a particular area of concern for bandicoot populations.

Conservation programs ecologist Helen Morgan who is leading the program from the conservation's end said the program aimed to track habitat and population for bandicoots and other native wildlife.

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Farmers and landowners are giving a helping hand to the Eastern-barred bandicoot with technology's help.

NRM North and the Tasmanian Land Conservancy are delivering a five-year project aimed at supporting the population of Eastern-barred bandicoots in Tasmania.

The project is targeting the Northern Midlands area as a particular area of concern for bandicoot populations.

Conservation programs ecologist Helen Morgan who is leading the program from the conservation's end, said the program aimed to track habitat and population for bandicoots and other native wildlife.

"We are encouraging farmers and landowners across the Northern Midlands to put a camera or multiple cameras on their property," she said.

One of the images taken by the WildTracker project.

One of the images taken by the WildTracker project.

"The cameras are established and run 24 hours day to capture images of wildlife and their movements."

Ms Morgan said she hoped the program would help track wildlife populations, but also help to understand better the threat posed to wildlife.

"We are finding a lot of cats as well, and they are a major predatory threat to bandicoots," she said.

"One of the major reasons the bandicoot populations are in decline is the predation of cats and dogs."

She said farmers could help if they understand where native wildlife are on their farm by re-vegetation.

"We are not trying to exclude wildlife from properties, but we can find pockets where they are living," she said.

One of the major reasons the bandicoot populations are in decline is the predation of cats and dogs. - Ecologist Helen Morgan

Creating shelterbelts and cover areas for native wildlife would help to provide strongholds to help them survive.

The program helps to educate landowners about the movements of wildlife across their property.

It will also help them with their re-vegetation efforts.

"We are working with landowners with their re-vegetation plans supported by the data," she said.

So far, since the program launched, 55 cameras have been installed on rural properties.

The images are being processed and collated by the Conservancy.

However, Ms Morgan said they would always welcome any further interest from other landowners.

The Australian Government funds the program.

  • Anyone interested in installing a camera for the WildTracker project contact NRM North on 6333 7777.

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