Balharrie dies in farming incident

Bruce Balharrie dies in farm incident

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LAST SALE: Bruce Balharrie, with his late father Max in 2007, has been recognised as a perfectionist. Photo supplied.

LAST SALE: Bruce Balharrie, with his late father Max in 2007, has been recognised as a perfectionist. Photo supplied.

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Ballarat livestock agent Bruce Balharrie who died on the weekend, has been remembered as a perfectionist.

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The livestock industry is mourning the death of stock agent, Bruce Balharrie, Ballarat, on the weekend.

Mr Balharrie aged was killed in a tractor incident on his farm near Myrniong south east of Ballarat.

He has been described as a stickler for detail where the client always came first.

Mr Balharrie began his agency career at Crawford Dowling in Ballarat after completing school. Later he struck out with his late father Max to form Max and Bruce Balharrie Pty Ltd .

After 20 years he joined Landmark, now Nutrien, in 2007 and had a strong local following of loyal clients.

Nutrien Ballarat livestock manager Xavier Shanahan said Mr Balharrie's greatest attribute were his attention to detail - "he dotted the i's and crossed the t's," he said.

"He was very personable and had a sense of humour. He was always able to come up with a one-liner," he said.

He was very personable and had a sense of humour. He was always able to come up with a one-liner - Xavier Shanahan, Nutrien Ag, Ballarat

Mr Shanahan said Mr Balharrie was respected by everyone in the industry - "large or small, from agents, clients, buyers, staff and contractors".

He said Mr Balharrie prided himself on his own presentation as well as ensuring his client's livestock were presented in the best possible way. "He would give his all in the yards," he said.

Long-time client and "best mate for more than 40 years", Linton Reilly, Corack, said Mr Balharrie was "a real gentleman and an absolute perfectionist".

"Bruce didn't have a lazy bone in his body. If there was a lamb that got into the wrong pen he would get in a put it where it was supposed to be," he said.

"He always said that you should respect the buyers no matter what."

"Bruce was always up for a chat when he visited onfarm - full of chat and discussion about the stock and markets. We always talked about what buyers wanted and what markets the stock would be best for."

Mr Balharrie had three children with wife Janine - Max, Kate and Ned. Ned is a third-generation stock agent working with Nutrien at Wagga Wagga, NSW.

In a statement, the Australian Livestock and Property Agents Association said: "The ALPA family is a special one and may we offer our sincere condolences to wife Janine, three children Max, Kate and Ned and the entire Balharrie family."

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