Neringah on market for first time in 20 years

Neringah on market for first time in 20 years

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After 20 years of cattle and sheep farming, the Williams family is ready to downsize and sell their colonial Georgian homestead at Boorowa.

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Malcolm and Raylee Williams purchased three properties in the NSW Southern Slopes in 2000 and merged the land to become the 875-hectare estate Neringah.

After 20 years of cattle and sheep farming, the couple is ready to downsize and sell their colonial Georgian homestead at Boorowa.

"When we bought the property I had already been involved in breeding Poll Hereford cattle and showing prize-winning bulls so a life in the bush ran deeply in my veins but my wife Raylee was looking forward to indulging in and expanding her passion for watercolour painting," Mr Williams said.

"At the time we decided that the next chapter in our lives would be the exciting prospect of finding a property like Neringah and once we did, we embarked on designing a home and lifestyle very different from our Balmain home."

The couple haven't been idle during the tenure of Neringah, overseeing improvements and renovations to both the land and farming infrastructure on the property.

"We set about bringing the soils back to high performance and planting 3000 trees in the lane as a way to rapidly move stock from one area to another," he said.

"We also returned troughs and fencing to a high standard, maintained and improved existing dams and bore water and recently we installed a desalination plant."

Other infrastructure improvements include creating extensive laneways for trafficking stock from all paddocks, the construction of a new three-stand shearing shed, reticulated water to troughs throughout and rainwater tanks able to collect up to 600,000 litres of water.

The colonial Georgian homestead was also constructed by the Williams as a nod to the English pastoralists that travelled west and created a booming agricultural industry in the state's Southern Tablelands.

"In the past, English farmers took up their selection of land and built mud and daub homes reminiscent of the style of their past lives in England and Ireland, with plenty of space for family and friends to come and relax," Mr Williams said.

"We were inspired by this and then set about creating a 'frame' for the house in establishing a beautiful garden meandering through the flowers and trees and creating a Bay Leaf maze."

Ray White Rural NSW state manager Chris Malone said the property, which is rated at 6500 dry sheep equivalent, has had a strong level of enquiry.

"The interest we have received in a property of this calibre shouldn't come as a surprise, and coupled with our vendor's willingness to meet the market on auction day, the response has been positive," Mr Malone said.

"It is a mixed farming opportunity with immaculate improvements; I have rarely seen a property that has such good infrastructure and improvements."

The auction will be held online at 10:30am, Friday, June 12.

You can find more information, here.

The story Neringah on market for first time in 20 years first appeared on Farm Online.

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