Farming gets its own Uber service

Uber for farm supplies the next way to beat COVID-19

Coronavirus
Aa

Rural supply stores are captilising on the statewide lockdown by increasing the home delivery of farm supplies. Dubbed the uber of farm supplies, the owner o...

Aa
HOME DELIVERY: James Anderson, with son Noah and Drover, says he's experienced a jump in on-farm deliveries.

HOME DELIVERY: James Anderson, with son Noah and Drover, says he's experienced a jump in on-farm deliveries.

Rural supply stores are captilising on the statewide lockdown by increasing the home delivery of farm supplies.

Dubbed the uber of farm supplies, the owner of one rural supply store, at Tallarook, has increased his deliveries to properties, after the Victorian government introduced strict movement restrictions.

A central Victorian farm supply business has increased its deliveries to properties, after the Victorian government introduced restrictions on movements.

James Anderson, Tallarook Rural Supplies, said while the doors were still open, he had noticed an increase in primary producers wanting supplies delivered on-farm.

"We're doing more deliveries than we did a week ago," Mr Anderson said.

But he said there was still widespread confusion over what were essential, and non-essential, services.

"I think people are more concerned about supply chains, than the delivery component of the business, they are more concerned about whether or not we can obtain products.

"There's still major uncertainty around the classification of agriculture, and associated industries, as an essential service."

He said due to the uncertainty, rural supply businesses had to adopt their practices to supply products to the farming community, safely and responsibly.

"Animals need to be fed and there are issues with bio-security and animal health," he said.

Country Road Farm Supplies, Camperdown, was also trading as normal, until things changed, sales manager Mick Royal said.

'We do a lot of on farm deliveries, anything they need to run their business, a lot of it is seed and dairy chemicals," Mr Royal said.

"It's business as usual, until we are told otherwise."



Russell Mawson, Nutrien Ag Solutions, Euroa, said while onfarm deliveries had not picked up significantly, there had been increased demand in the store

"Everybody is aware, everybody is nervous, nobody wants to get crook, whether they be customers or staff," Mr Mawson said.

He said people had become much better with their personal hygiene.

"Everybody is going back to being a bit old fashioned," he said.

The store had tried to disperse as many staff as possible, with the stock agents working out of their cars.

"Every day it's a moving target, we are trying our hardest to get people set up for the next six months," Mr Mawson said.

"When you put your pasture in, it's for the next six months, so it gets your business set in order, and you are going to be able to ride it out."

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by