Victoria watching interstate unloading trial

Victoria watching Queensland safer stock unloading trial

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SAFER UNLOADING: The Proway Pivoting, or Parallel, Access Landing (P.A.L.) frame is being trialled in Queensland. The Livestock and Rural Transporters Association of Victoria is watching the trial closely.

SAFER UNLOADING: The Proway Pivoting, or Parallel, Access Landing (P.A.L.) frame is being trialled in Queensland. The Livestock and Rural Transporters Association of Victoria is watching the trial closely.

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Victoria's peak livestock transport body is closely watching a Queensland stock unloading trial.

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The state's peak livestock transport body is hoping a Queensland trial of an improved stock unloading system will see widespread adoption of the technology in Victoria.

Livestock and Rural Transporters Association of Victoria (LRTAV) Safety Committee chairman Mick Debenham said companies had agreed to pay to use a safer stock unloading system at a Queensland processor.

The Proway Pivoting, or Parallel, Access Landing (P.A.L.) frame was being trialled at Kilcoy Global Foods in south-east Queensland.

Mr Debenham said the LRTAV backed an Australian Livestock and Rural Transporters Association (ALRTA) plan to levy a small fee on companies using the frame, with the aim of offsetting the cost of its installation.

"This is more of a desperate attempt from our industry to try and ensure we can do our job more safely," Mr Debenham said.

"So we are investigating the feasibility of trying to get the crates introduced, from a user pays perspective."

He said most employers were keen to keep staff safe, provided the fee was not too great.

The P.A.L. system eliminated the need for drivers to climb up on the side of trucks, reducing the chance of falls or being struck by livestock.

ALRTA executive director Matt Munro said there was an assumption P.A.L. users would be prepared to pay for its installation.

"We want to work out what they are prepared to pay and the total payback period for the infrastructure provider," Mr Munro said.

The charge was initially set at $15, reducing every fortnight, until it was removed completely.

ALRTA would use the de-identified data on usage rates at different charging levels, to calculate how long it would take to fully recover the cost of a P.A.L. frame.

"What we are looking for is the shortest possible payback period, so we have a compelling business case to put to abattoirs and saleyards," Mr Munro said.

"It then comes down to what sort of capital planning budget operators have.

"There are no excuses as to 'will it work at my site?'

"It's more, 'what price are you prepared to pay for safety?'".

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