Fleece proceeds go to brain cancer research

Fleece proceeds go to brain cancer research


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FLEECE DONATION: Ken Yann and Rob Williams, Australian Wool Testing Authority, Candice Cordy, Landmark, Stephen and Connie Glen, Wattle Bank Merino stud, Tess Cochrane, Axedale, and Mark Rosenthal, COGNO.

FLEECE DONATION: Ken Yann and Rob Williams, Australian Wool Testing Authority, Candice Cordy, Landmark, Stephen and Connie Glen, Wattle Bank Merino stud, Tess Cochrane, Axedale, and Mark Rosenthal, COGNO.

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The generosity of Australian woolgrowers has resulted in over $10,000 being donated to brain cancer research.

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The generosity of Australian woolgrowers has resulted in over $10,000 being donated to brain cancer research.

Fleece from the National Fleece Competition was auctioned off at the Melbourne woolstores on Wednesday, with the proceeds going to the Cooperative Trials Group for Neuro-Oncology (COGNO).

Competition convener Candice Cordy, Landmark, said COGNO was nominated by local farming families who had been long-time supporters of the competition and who had been affected by brain cancer.

Ms Cordy said the $10,000 donation to COGNO was a "fantastic result" given fleece numbers were down and the wool market was down on last year.

She said it proved the generosity of the country's woolgrowers.

The 213 fleeces that were offered for sale sold between 1080-1326 cents a kilogram greasy.

These fleeces were over half of the 364 fleeces that were entered into the National Fleece Competition.

Central Victoria's Wattle Bank Merino stud won the coveted competition, which was celebrated at the Australian Sheep & Wool Show in Bendigo last month.

The Glen brothers had supported the fleece competition for the last 19 years, but this was their first big win.

Stephen Glen and his sister-in-law Connie Glen, who have lost a family member to brain cancer, were at the woolstores to watch the bales sell.

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COGNO former chairman Mark Rosenthal was also at the woolstores, and said every dollar counted to "deal with this dreadful disease".

"Brain cancer is a pretty tough disease," Mr Rosenthal said.

"The care of patients has improved significantly over 15-20 years and COGNO has contributed through clinical trials and treatments."

He said it was remarkable that woolgrowers donated so much wool to the cause.

"Brain cancer doesn't select," he said.

"It can affect anybody and I think it's only when it affects someone or a group that it's recognised and in this instance it's touched this particular group of woolgrowers and as a community they've come together to provide support which is so important."

The $10,000 donation brings the total donation to national charities through the competition to just under $180,000.

Ms Cordy said the competition provided charities with a platform to reach a rural audience with their message and service offering.

Next year is the competition's 20th year.

"We're hoping to make it the biggest and best yet and we'd love for everyone to keep a fleece aside," Ms Cordy said.

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