Perendales have winning combination

A winning combination for Mount Monmot's Perendales

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Mount Monmot's consistent wool type is praised by the Perendale judge.

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Mount Monmot Perendales took out the Dick Clayton Perpetual Trophy for Perendale supreme champion. The ribbon winning ram is with Mount Monmot's Trudy Boyer and Malcolm Fletcher.

Mount Monmot Perendales took out the Dick Clayton Perpetual Trophy for Perendale supreme champion. The ribbon winning ram is with Mount Monmot's Trudy Boyer and Malcolm Fletcher.

Metung judge Neil Hopkins has praised the combination, the structure and excellent wool of animals displayed by Skipton's Mount Monmot Perendale stud, at this year's Australian Sheep & Wool Show.

Mr Hopkins, Greyoaks Cheviot stud, said those attributes were clear in both the champion ram and ewe.

"The ram was the combination of very good structure and very good wool," Mr Hopkins said.

"In particular, it was the structure.

"Mount Monmot has been getting the proportions right, with not too much shoulder and front, compared with the rump.

"The value in a lamb is in the rump and loin, if they get too big and blocky at the front, you get lambing problems."

Mr Hopkins said he had paid particular attention to the shape and size of the sheep's shoulders.

"That ram has that proportion of not being too big in the front, but nice and broad in the rump," he said.

The structure of the champion ewe also impressed him.

"Out of the senior ewes it had the best shaped shoulder, and proportion of front to rear end," he said.

"At the same time, it had a beautifully, even fleece."

Mr Hopkins said even the reserve champion impressed him.

"She has a beautiful, even fleece, and it is real Perendale type wool, not too fine and not too coarse," he said.

"It's where it should be."

Mr Hopkins praised Mount Monmot for offering sheep with a consistent wool type.

"You can have flocks that have a slightly different style, but they have got theirs down to a fairly narrow band," he said.

He said Mount Monmot was breeding a sheep with wool that was not too coarse, and not too fine.

"They have got it about there in the middle," he said.

Trudy Boyer, Mount Monmot, said the stud was selling between 30-35 rams a year, by private treaty.

"Over the years our selection process has really improved through our breeding program, as well as in the sheep we chose for showing," Ms Boyer said.

"Experience tells the tale."

There were eight Perendale studs and several commercial breeders, still operating in Australia.

Ms Boyer said Mount Monmot had ensured it brought in multiple bloodlines from New Zealand, before the ban on the import of semen and eggs.

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