Tamaleuca hits on-property sale record

Tamaleuca Merino stud hits on-property sale record

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Tamaleuca stud principal Kevin Crook, with top-priced buyer Locky Gleeson, ‘Warrawee Pastoral Company’, Kyalite, NSW, and Elders auctioneer Geoff Sutton.

Tamaleuca stud principal Kevin Crook, with top-priced buyer Locky Gleeson, ‘Warrawee Pastoral Company’, Kyalite, NSW, and Elders auctioneer Geoff Sutton.

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New and repeat buyers sought out quality dual purpose Merino and Poll Merino rams at Tamaleuca’s on-property sale.

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*61 of 72 rams sold to $5800, av $1643

NEW and repeat buyers sought out quality dual purpose Merino and Poll Merino rams at Tamaleuca’s recent sale, which saw the stud hit a new on-property record.

The Ouyen stud recorded an 85 per cent clearance rate, selling 61 of 72 rams, to an average price of $1643.

The top price of $5800 is up $1900 on last year’s top price, and was the highest price the stud has ever sold a ram for at its on-property auctions.

Stud principal Kevin Crook was extremely pleased with the result, particularly given many clients from up north, who are experiencing dry conditions, were unable to attend.

“It’s so dry north of us, we’ve even had some clients who have destocked,” Mr Crook said.

But the strength in the sheep and wool markets meant the stud’s dual purpose sheep were in high demand.

Mr Crook said the top-priced ram, Lot 6, who was purchased by Greg Rae and Locky Gleeson, ‘Warrawee Pastoral Company’, Kyalite, NSW, was one of three or four standouts in the first few pens.

“On the day, Lot 6 could have weighed close to 130 kilograms, it was just his sheer size and massive barrell that made him stand out,” he said.

Mr Rae said he thought the ram was “perfectly balanced”, with good size and structure, and nice, white crimpy wool.

Lot 6 recorded fleece measurements of 19.7 micron, 3 standard deviation, and 99.7pc comfort factor.

The ram was one of seven rams purchased by Warrawee.

The second top-priced ram was purchased by return clients of almost two decades, Lindsay and Robyn Plant, ‘Wandown’, Manangatang, who bought two, after purchasing one for $3500 from the stud at the Australian Sheep and Wool Show (ASWS) in Bendigo in July.

Lot 2 was their $5000 purchase, who Mr Plant said was his “pick of the sale”.

“I really liked his deep, crimpy, soft-handling wool, and his good frame,” Mr Plant said.

He said they have been purchasing for so many years because they have been having continued success.

“They’re good wool cutters, good doing sheep, suit our conditions well, and are highly fertile,” he said.

And those conditions have been tough this year, with only 75 millimetres of rain falling so far.

He said Tamaleuca had transition to a polled flock at the same time he had, making ram purchases more suitable.

He said the rams would be joined to ewes in November for an April/May-drop.

Another big buyer on the day was ‘Ettershank’, who purchased seven to a top of $3500.

Mr Crook said seeing people buy in bulk was rewarding.

“Our rams are dual purpose, they still cut a lot of wool but are also making a lot of money in the saleyards,” he said.

Given it was only the stud’s third on-property sale, he said it was pleasing to get new buyers, and stud buyers, turn up to the sale.

He credits word-of-mouth and showing to the stud’s growing popularity.

“You can’t sell a secret, so if they don’t know what you’ve got, they’re not going to come and buy, that’s why we show,” he said.

They show at all major shows, including ASWS, Sheepvention in Hamilton, and the Royal Adelaide Show, SA.

Adelaide is their biggest show, where they will be selling two rams, the “cream of the crop” at the end of the week.

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