Interest sought for pulse protein plant

Pulse protein powder plant: Wimmera Development Association seeks investors

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Wimmera Development Association is looking for investors for its world-first pulse powder plant.

WIMMERA Development Association executive director Ralph Kenyon believes a pulse processing plant in the region would create jobs and a market for farmers’ pulse grain waste.

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The world-first project will convert the waste into protein powder.

The association received state government funding in 2014 to investigate the potential for a processing factory in the region.

Mr Kenyon said the association was now exploring options to secure investors.

“Once we do that, we can see whether or not project is viable or not,” he said.

“We are putting the feelers out and trying to find out whether or not anyone wants to invest in the plant.

“We’ve been talking to a number of different people, but there is no firm commitment yet.”

Wimmera Development Association is looking for investors for its world-first pulse powder plant.

Wimmera Development Association is looking for investors for its world-first pulse powder plant.

Mr Kenyon said the association was still exploring options for the plant.

”The Wimmera Development Association has put a lot of work into this project and it’s content and we will continue to exploring any opportunities,” he said.

“We would like to see the project come to fruition.”

Mr Kenyon said if a plant was built in the Wimmera it would benefit the entire region. 

“A project like this would provide an opportunity for more jobs,” he said.

“It will also gives farmers another option for dealing with their pulse crops and exporting commodities.”

Wimmera Grains Cluster is leading the project. 

The cluster is a group within the Wimmera Development Association, which comprises businesses in both the grains sector and supply chain industries.

The processing plant would make powder from pulse grain waste, which could potentially be used in cereal, muesli bars, health foods, consumable protein powders and ready-made meals.

The powder is 85 per cent protein and has not been used in food production before.

Member for Lowan Emma Kealy discussed the idea for a pulse processing plant with business leaders in Japan and South Korea during a trade mission.

She said politicians were aware that setting up a plant in the Wimmera would be a good opportunity for farmers and the community.

“If we can get it up and running it will create jobs and give our pulse producers a market for their secondary waste produce,” she said.

“This plant would help producers on-sell their products and get the best possible prices for pulses.”

Story courtesy The Wimmera Mail Times

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