Rain falls at Gelantipy sale

Rain falls at Gelantipy sale


Beef
Aa

Gelantipy, set high in the mountains over the great dividing range, is the last of the high country sales in Victoria for 2017.

Gelantipy, set high in the mountains over the great dividing range, is the last of the high country sales in Victoria for 2017.

Aa

It is very dry, and this affected the quality of some of the 1585 cattle offered at Gelantipy. However, a thunderstorm passed close by during the sale, and this brought out an umbrella to protect the booking book.

No one was concerned by the rain, and locals hoped it would stay around for a while. However, local rain gauges only recorded 7-14mm, during the sale, and into the evening. This was better than most districts.

Tradition is the greatest drawcard for this sale, where some producers used to walk their cattle to the yards, although this does not happen now. Occupational health and safety doesn’t allow this any more.

The largest vendor now, is FA&DM Boulton, who own, among other district properties, Gelantipy station, which is situated directly across the road.

Last year the Gelantipy Station cattle were fat, following a very good year, and weighed 30-50 kilograms more than the 731 Angus and Angus-Hereford steers sold Monday.

They also sold 62 heifers.

This sale, or more importantly, these cattle attract a feedlot buyer from New South Wales, and the competition between him and a South Gippsland bullock fattener, is usually very strong.

Competition between these two buyers was not as buoyant this year with most heading north at cheaper rates than 2016. Some of this was due to their changed quality.

The 214 older steers sold from $1250-$1380, and the younger, and lighter weight steers, $960-$1310, to average $1185 overall. 

There was a notable difference between the first five pens, and the young steers, which makes the sale of the later, more acceptable, although not perfect.

The balance of the sale comprised of 2016 drop steers and heifers, and although there was some variation, prices were generally very good.

TE Woodgate sold 157 Hereford steers from $930-$1320, the top prices being equal to other sales.

Keith Davies topped the day selling 55 Hereford steers, Mawarra blood, from $950-$1410.

Keith made the effort to weigh his cattle under curfew conditions, and reaped the benefits.

GA&SA Moon sold 95 Hereford steers from $890 for young steer calves, to $1280.

Competition from a South Australian producer aided a steady sale for heifer calves, purchasing more than half of the yarding. These heifers will be backgrounded for lot feeding or future fattening.

Prices for all heifers ranged between $660 and $930. TE Woodgate sold 75 heifers from $790-$930 and FA&DM Boulton, 62 Angus heifers from $850-$910.

The hub of the Gelantipy mountain cattle sale is the canteen. Many of the local ladies, bake, cook and make sandwiches to feed the crowd, and discuss the sale.

The hub of the Gelantipy mountain cattle sale is the canteen. Many of the local ladies, bake, cook and make sandwiches to feed the crowd, and discuss the sale.

Some of the Henderson selling team at Gelantipy, Bill and Anne-Marie, right, and Brent and Merryn, before the sale started.

Some of the Henderson selling team at Gelantipy, Bill and Anne-Marie, right, and Brent and Merryn, before the sale started.

Tim Woodgate, and mother, Melba Woodgate were both sellers at Gelantipy, Monday. Tim sold 40 of his Hereford steers to $1320 in a good sale.

Tim Woodgate, and mother, Melba Woodgate were both sellers at Gelantipy, Monday. Tim sold 40 of his Hereford steers to $1320 in a good sale.

Auction time at Gelantipy.

Auction time at Gelantipy.

Keith and Ann-Marie Davies topped Gelantipy with their Mawarra blood Hereford steers, at $1410. Their daughter, Deanne Sykes, Mawarra Hereford Stud lends support.

Keith and Ann-Marie Davies topped Gelantipy with their Mawarra blood Hereford steers, at $1410. Their daughter, Deanne Sykes, Mawarra Hereford Stud lends support.

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by