Water to be released from Menindee

Water to be released from Meinindee

News
Aa

Release rates from the Menindee Lakes system are to be increased, to deliver water ordered by the Murray Darling Basin Authority (MDBA).

Release rates from the Menindee Lakes system are to be increased, to deliver water ordered by the Murray Darling Basin Authority (MDBA).

Aa
The Murray-Darling River confluence, in flood, late last year.

The Murray-Darling River confluence, in flood, late last year.

WaterNSW systems operations general manager Adrian Langdon, said the Menindee Lakes system was managed to supply licensed customers including Essential Water and Lower Darling landholders, as well as ensuring water security along the Murray.

Mr Langdon said WaterNSW would aim to maintain as much water in the upper two lakes as possible, as a drought contingency, in line with established practice.

"WaterNSW will continue sourcing the majority of the release volume from Lake Menindee, as well as a smaller amount from Lake Wetherell,” Mr Langdon said.

"Lake Wetherell is currently at 125 per cent capacity so the intention is to lower the level to remove water from the flood plain to protect the health of the ecosystem.

"WaterNSW’s recent operations have ensured that the upper lakes are full from last season’s inflows and Pamamaroo will be used as storage to meet future needs recognising that its level will fall due to evaporation," Mr Langdon said.

In accordance with the longstanding Murray–Lower Darling Water Sharing Plan, the MDBA has directed the release to provide for demand along the Lower Darling and for the Murray downstream, of the Darling River confluence.

MDBA head of river operations, David Dreverman, said high evaporation losses from the Menindee Lakes meant the storages were used ahead of others, such as Dartmouth Dam.

"It makes sense to use water from shallow storages first, Menindee releases over summer and autumn will enable hundreds of gigalitres of water to be reserved in Dartmouth Dam for use by the whole Murray valley in future years," Mr Dreverman said.

"Menindee lakes are shallow, and average around five metres deep and can evaporate at a rate of about two metres a year.

"Safeguards are built into the water sharing arrangements so that the use of Menindee Lakes is limited to protect local New South Wales town water supply and lower Darling use once lake volumes fall below 480GL," Mr Dreverman said.

From Monday (January 9) releases will increase from the current 1800 megalitres per day (ML/day), rising to 6500ML/day by Friday and remain at this rate for up to three days.

Releases will then be reduced to 5000ML/day by January 19 and remain at this rate until January 24. Release rates are subject to change and will depend on operational conditions.

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by