Corriedales good commercial sheep

Corriedales good commercial sheep


Wool
Woodleigh school, Langwarrin, took out the Supreme Champion Corriedale, with this ewe and lambs, pictured with handlers Cooper Scott, 12, Tom Illman, 13, and Caley Hood, 13.

Woodleigh school, Langwarrin, took out the Supreme Champion Corriedale, with this ewe and lambs, pictured with handlers Cooper Scott, 12, Tom Illman, 13, and Caley Hood, 13.

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CORRIEDALE exhibitors at the Royal Melbourne Show were producing sheep which addressed "commercial realities", according to judge David Jackson.

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CORRIEDALE exhibitors at the Royal Melbourne Show were producing sheep which addressed "commercial realities", according to judge David Jackson.

Mr Jackson, Moyston, Vic, said the animals he judged were a very good, dual purpose breed, with good carcase characteristics.

He awarded the Supreme champion to a Woodleigh School, Langwarrin, Vic, ewe, with two lambs at foot.

"This is a great ewe," Mr Jackson said.

Studs must address commercial realities, in showing sheep, and the ewe was very impressive, he said.

"It's got to be related to the sheep, out there in the paddocks – this is a correct ewe, with correct lambs and she is doing a good job with those two lambs," Mr Jackson said.

"I think that is what the sheep farmers want to see.

"They don't want to see sheep that are too blown up, just for show, but this one has no faults, and neither have the lambs, and that's what farmers want to see."

"I can't understand people who are wanting a little bit more dual purpose meat and wool sheep, that they are not a little bit more popular."

Woodleigh agriculture and horticulture teacher Charlie Clarke said the school had been running Corriedales for about 10 years.

They are dual purpose, which suits the school – we have to think about the wool, as well as the meat," Mr Clarke said.

"We could go for Merinos, but you wouldn't have the meat and they are probably a bit more difficult to keep – Corriedales are a good, hardy breed as well, with a good temperament."

Mr Clarke said the 50 strong flock was run by the students, from throughout the school.

"The kids, basically, they run the flock; they manage it, they do all the work on the sheep, they manage the breeding program, they manage the pastures, they do everything."

Bloodlines used by the school included Quamby Plains, Hagley, Tas, and Sweetfields, Mt Moriac, Vic genetics.

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