Table Top champions in the spotlight

Table Top champions in the spotlight


Stock and Land Beef
Tim and Jessica Scott, Table Top Angus, Albury, NSW, are hoping to perform well in the RASV heifer challenge again this year.

Tim and Jessica Scott, Table Top Angus, Albury, NSW, are hoping to perform well in the RASV heifer challenge again this year.

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SEED stock champions Tim and Jessica Scott of Table Top Angus, near Albury, NSW, are relishing in their 2014 Royal Agricultural Society of Victoria 2014 Heifer Challenge win.

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SEED stock champions Tim and Jessica Scott of Table Top Angus, near Albury, NSW, are relishing in their 2014 Royal Agricultural Society of Victoria 2014 Heifer Challenge win.

The Scotts have seen a spike in demand since taking out the top heifer challenge title against 60 competing studs from Victoria, Southern NSW and South Australia.

Judge Gavin Wall praised the pen of 17 month-old pregnancy tested in-calf (PTIC) heifers, which had conceived via synchronised artificial insemination.

This is a feat no other RASV Heifer Challenge entry had claimed to achieve.

During the awards, Mr Wall said the Scotts' pen of 10 heifers were a great genetic package that would make a significant contribution to the Angus breed.

The PTIC heifers were drafted from their contemporary mob just prior to the competition and have since successfully calved as two year-olds in July.

The win had has given Tim, Jessica and their clients confidence in their product and the direction they were taking the herd.

"Productivity in this job comes from fertility and that was evident with our heifers because they were able to conceive at a young age," Tim said.

He said the win had a major impact on demand due to the publicity and exposure received.

Jessica said the stud win was also a win for the Angus breed as it showed their fertility strength.

"Angus females can successfully raise a calve at two years of age without impacting on the females productivity or performance," she said.

"We've also found early production is then consistent through their breeding."

The Scotts have embarked on fixed-timed AI (FTAI) which stimulates and synchronises ovulation to enable mass insemination for ease of management.

Jessica said FTAI reduced the amount of times animals were through the yards and reduced labour needs.

The Scotts synchronise about 500 of their 1000 strong breeding herd.

By using FTAI, the Scotts have condensed calving and lessened their bull power requirement.

Tim said their fertility success was a combination of the stud's genetic progress and nutritional management.

While the stud continues to source outside genetics including leading sires from New Zealand, during the last few years the focus had been on self-bred sires.

"Our figures are competitive with those in AI catalogues and by using our own bulls we are able to assess structure and temperament which is important," Tim said.

This year Table Top Angus hopes to defend their title.

"Hopefully this year we can raise the bar once again – it would be nice to win again," he said.

Jessica said the concept of the award was good for the industry where it shone the spotlight on the females.

"There is a lot of focus in the media on the bulls but females have a major impact on Australian herds," she said.

"The pressure is on to keep performing."

The story Table Top champions in the spotlight first appeared on Farm Online.

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