Teys offers pasturefed premium

14 Jun, 2013 05:00 PM
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6
 

TEYS Australia has confirmed they will offer producers a 10c to 20c a kilogram premium for Certified Pasturefed cattle.

Teys Australia executive director livestock, Geoff Teys, Beenleigh, Queensland, spoke to Fairfax Agricultural Media this afternoon (Friday) and said under the Cattle Council of Australia's new Pasturefed Cattle Assurance Scheme (PCAS) they would offer producers a 10c/kg to 20c/kg premium above the Meat Standards Australia (MSA) price.

Teys Australia will accept PCAS pasturefed only cattle - free of hormone growth promotants (HGPs) and antibiotics - which will be marketed with the Certified Pasturefed label.

"We are indicating to producers that we will offer above the MSA price and depending on the market at the time our premium could possibly be higher than the European Union (EU) accredited price," Mr Teys said.

Mr Teys said they hoped to process the first PCAS cattle in the first week of August, provided enough suppliers signed onto the scheme by then.

"We have customers from a lot of markets interested in pasturefed beef and we can pass on a good premium price to producers," he said.

Mr Teys said they have had no input in establishing the PCAS standards and are involved purely from a processor viewpoint.

Northern NSW Hereford producers Scott and Pip Hann, Bellata, are keen to implement PCAS in their commercial cattle enterprise.

In fact, Mr Hann has called PCAS the most revolutionary development in the cattle job in his time. He said PCAS brings traceability to the beef business.

"They like to sell a story, it is what all the big supermarkets are doing," Mr Hann said.

"It is what the whole beef industry needed, a premium grassfed beef brand - not just a branded beef breed," he said.

Certified Pasturefed: how it works

BEEF producers can choose to become Pasturefed Cattle Assurance System (PCAS) accredited by undertaking an online self-audit to determine eligibility, registering their property and paying a $200 administration fee.

They will also need to successfully complete an on-site audit that will be conducted annually by an independent third party at an estimated cost of between $400 and $600 per audit.

Underpinning PCAS are standards which govern on-farm feed requirements and traceability of cattle as well as pre-slaughter handling practices that influence eating quality.

The standards also include two optional modules for producers who wish to raise cattle free from hormone growth promotants (HGPs) and antibiotics.

The requirements of the PCAS standards mean that eligible cattle:

  • have been fed only pasture their entire life;
  • have not been confined for the purposes of intensive feeding for production;
  • are fully traceable for their entire life via the National Livestock Identification System, and
  • are guaranteed to eat well, based on Meat Standards Australia, and if required are free from HGPs and/or free from antibiotics.

    To find out more visit the Certified Pasturefed website.

    To read more about PCAS and the Hann family's plans to implement it see next week's newspaper editions.

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    READER COMMENTS

    rosemary champion
    16/06/2013 11:05:30 PM

    How do we register for the pasture accreditation program. I am sure we would qualify we are situated 11kms from Longreach and run 1200 Santa Gertrudis commercial cattle on improved pastures eg buffel and various legumes stylos etc and Mitchell and Flinders grass. Please advise us of the next step in this excellent program.
    holisticmick
    17/06/2013 12:54:31 PM

    You will see a steady but solid demand for this type of product as consumers become more aware of the health benefits as well as ecological benefits of good grazing management (time control or holistic grazing management)
    dogsbody
    17/06/2013 10:51:05 PM

    This deserves the support of all cattle producers and has been a long time coming. Pasture fed beef has always tasted better and keeping antibiotics and hormones outof the food chain is a good thing.
    qlander
    19/06/2013 9:17:03 AM

    'depending on the market' 'premium could possibly be higher' I'm not knocking the idea, but I've been hearing this sort of stuff my entire life. - Still I'll be checking it out, I could have some cattle that will fit.
    ferndale
    19/06/2013 11:27:00 AM

    Standards & rules for PCAS - http://www.certifiedpasturefed.co m.au/standards-and-rules Great initiative! I hope all abattoirs across Australia will get on board.
    Robin J
    31/07/2013 9:40:54 AM

    we are returning to days past when almost all of the slaughter animals were grass fed

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