BJD eradication 'impossible'

06 Mar, 2013 03:00 AM
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THE Queensland government’s plan to eradicate bovine Johne's disease (BJD) from the State has come under question at a Rockhampton forum run by the Australian Beef Association (ABA).

About 200 beef producers heard Australian Johnes Alliance representative and forum organiser Don Lawson - a Victorian stud Angus breeder - describe the disease as "insignificant", despite the recent government push to preserve Queensland's BJD protected status.

The BJD outbreak was detected on a Central Queensland stud last November, forcing 171 properties initially into quarantine. Currently 71 are still quarantined, says Biosecurity Queensland.

Mr Lawson, a critic of the eradication plan, said the real issue with the outbreak was policy, not the actual disease. He said eradication of BJD was impossible for a number of reasons.

"There is no reliable test for the disease and no cure. The blood tests only identify about half the animals infected and the faecal test only detects the disease when the animal is shedding," he said.

Mr Lawson said the only exit strategy was to hand the disease management back to producers.

"The industry needs to undertake an eradication cost-benefit study, because you don't spend $100,000 on one sheep with fly strike," he said.

Veterinarian and University of Melbourne consultant John Webb Ware said BJD eradication was difficult and production impacts were minimal. He said the financial impact of control programs could spell the end of some businesses, and the threat would still remain.

"If we go down the eradication path, despite our best intentions and huge financial costs, infected herds will remain in Queensland and leave us vulnerable to future disease outbreaks," he said.

Australian Brahman Breeders Association (ABBA) general manager John Croaker said the financial and emotional cost to some of his members in the wake of the BJD trace-forward operation was immense. He reconfirmed ABBA's position that BJD should be a producer-managed disease.

ABA chair Brad Bellinger presented a resolution that a committee be formed to provide advice and do research into a practical BJD policy, and said the forum achieved the aims of “informing producers on the pitfalls of pursuing an eradication program and allowing them to see BJD in a less fearful light”.

Speakers from AgForce, Cattle Council and Federal Agriculture Minister Joe Ludwig’s office confirmed their commitment to an eradication plan, designed to protect export markets.

State Agriculture Minister John McVeigh will hold an official stakeholder meeting in Brisbane on March 26 to announce the direction of the government's BJD plan based on lab test results and the outcome of an independent review headed by former AgForce president Brent Finlay.

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READER COMMENTS

Gus
6/03/2013 8:19:07 AM

Perhaps gov departments and ag bodies that put the BJD laws together are protecting the current policy at all costs - just in case stepping sideways exposes them to llitigation. The well being of cattle producers is definitely not being addressed by these groups.
beeffarmervic
6/03/2013 9:41:10 AM

It is also about job justification in the face of any genuine attempt to analyse the impact of the disease on beef herds and the impact on markets. The lack of free trading agreements with our trading partners is far greater. But you need a politician to solve that one not a vet. Look at BSE, 90 % of meat produced in the USA is now eligible fro export to Japan and ABARE is forcasting further declines of 6% in our exports to Japan. This decline is not about Johnnes,BSE or FMD it is about market access.
Jen from the bush
6/03/2013 9:46:47 AM

Well maybe they are also trying to protect the Indo LE market they did their level best to kill as to my understanding, currently Indonesia will not accept any cattle from BJD places. Another knock for northern live export cattle producers. Our export forms clearly ask for this information.

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COMMENTS

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Kate WHEN farmers earn more from local abattoirs - Live export will end. So how about instead of
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As far I am concerned people who advocate, withdrawing and leaving the animals of these
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The live export trade has had years to lift its game. It is clear no matter what systems are put